In  broad terms it is the ‘technical’ term for teaching Good teaching is quite an art, but good teachers know the science of teaching too, i.e. the universally effective practices in teaching. The science of teaching includes certain fundamental steps to be followed by teachers while teaching in classrooms (‘inclass processes’) and certain follow up activities after every teaching period (‘post-class processes’). Here is a list of five in class processes and five post-class processes to be followed as a good teaching practice and the reality on the ground against each of ten processes.

In-class processes
Expectations from good teachers The ground reality – status of the majority of teachers w.r.t. the  expectations
Good domain knowledge. This is important because teachers remain the only source of domain knowledge for students (even the textbooks are not read by students). The domain knowledge of teachers leaves a lot to be desired. Students are getting poor quality inputs and we cannot expect the quality of output to be better than the quality of input.
Effective communication strategies and skills in classroom transactions. Significant discussions and conversations in classrooms. A big skill gap!

In most classrooms, both students and teachers have poor communication skills. Classroom ‘discussions’ does not move beyond definitions and examples! There is little discussion or debate in classrooms. A grave area of concern.

In-class processes
Better English language transactions in maths and science classes.

‘Stories’ in maths and science can only be shared when teachers and students are competent in the medium of instruction.

The domain knowledge of teachers leaves a lot to be desired. Students are getting poor quality inputs and we cannot expect the quality of output to be better than the quality of input.
Sincere ‘display of passion’ for the subject.

Emotional component in any communication is always more impactful and has long term effect.

Almost non-existent!

Ironically, the biggest problem due to this issue is that we will not get to see good new teachers! Good teachers are passionate about their subject and attract others to follow them.

High share of students’ expression in every period. Minimal teachers’ top down communication and students’ discussions are the bigger part of every period. The reality is starkly ancient – 90% top down communication, 10% bottom up and 0% lateral discussion. It needs to change ASAP.
Post-class processes
Expectations from good teachers The ground reality – status of the majority of teachers w.r.t. the expectations
Assessment design – Formative

Assessments (FA) must assess all concepts taught in a chapter. Specific assessments around application of each of the concept are also planned.

Formative Assessments (FA) may not even assess 50% of the concepts taught. Inadequate FA and even more inadequate assessments of application of the concepts taught.

Obviously, concepts which are not assessed are simply ignored and forgotten by students – a major cause of breach of hierarchical structure of concept development in maths and science.

Post-class processes
Expectations from good teachers The ground reality – status of the majority of teachers w.r.t. the expectations
Progress reporting – Micro-, actionable and cumulative for students, parents and teachers. Gross (e.g. 90% or A grade) and non-actionable (mostly ‘postmortem’) reporting – fairly useless for all the stakeholders to take corrective actions.

Specific feedback – a vital tool in any endeavour – is missing in school education.

Remedial quality – child-specific, concept-wise, and remedial not abandoned till every student gains confidence in all prior knowledge and current class concepts. Thought-less remedial processes are a bitter secret of school education and one of its weakest spots. For example, ‘weaker students’ are expected to understand a chapter in one period in the ‘remedial mode’ which they could not understand in eight periods of the routine class. Almost always, remedial is a formality.
Teachers as learners!

Extensively read books other than the text books and regularly access the ever-enriching resources on the Internet for new content and teaching learning processes.

Not a learner!

Teachers are non-readers and technologically handicapped.

Supporting the talented beyond & current class content. Incidentally, supporting talented children is quite a matter of joy because such students are self-learners and need support in assessments and occasional clarifications. Talented students are as marginalised as the weaker ones; schools have no specific support to nurture the talented children. In fact, with each promotion to a newer class, talented children lose this streak due to non-nurturance.

Clearly, one of the toughest challenges in teaching maths and science is the lack of good teaching practices. School managements, principals, and heads of department of maths and science must urgently improve teaching practices of maths and science.

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